huzzah!

The Yankees are out!

The Indians defeated the Yankees 6-4 in last night's game. Be sure to tune in Friday evening to watch the Red Sox beat the Indians. It should shape up to be a good series, as both teams are hot and have been doing extremely well. Josh Beckett will be pitching Friday night, and he's been pitching great games. I'll be cheering for the Red Sox to make it to the World Series.

8 comments:

mo*reezy said...

Can I get a WOOT WOOT?!?!?

Anonymous said...

What is this word HUZZAH? It's new to me. I like it and plan to find a way to work it into a conversation soon!!!! :):)
auntiepatty

Anonymous said...

Oh, and WOOT WOOT?? Where did THAT come from? Help me use it also!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!ap

Disco Stu said...

Huzzah, originally "huzza," is an English interjection of joy or approbation. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, it is "apparently a mere exclamation" without any particular derivation. Whatever its origins, it has seen occasional literary use since at least the time of Shakespeare. Huzzah may be categorized with such interjections as "hoorah" and "hooray." According to the Oxford English Dictionary: "In English, the form 'hurrah' is literary and dignified; 'hooray' is usual in popular acclamation." In common usage, such as cheers at sporting events and competitions, distinction need not be made by the speaker and the words are distinguished by regional dialect and accent. "Hooray" comes from the Mongolian "hurree," used by Mongol armies and spread throughout the world during the Mongol Empire of the 1200s. In Mongolian, "hurree" is a sacred praise much like amen or hellelujah. The Oxford English Dictionary notes that in the 17th and 18th centuries it was identified as a sailor's cheer or salute, and thus was possibly related to words like "heeze" and "hissa," which are cognates of hoist. In the 18th and early 19th centuries, three "huzzahs" were given by British infantry before a charge, as a way of building morale and intimidating the enemy. The book "Redcoat" by Richard Holmes indicates that this was given as two short huzzahs followed by a third sustained one as the charge was carried out. U.S. Navy sailors belonging to aircraft carrier airwings have also recently adopted the term. In this context, it is used similarly as a cry of cheer or salutation, but with a tone of mocking of the similar "oorah" of U.S. Marines, "hooah" of U.S. Army, or "hooya" of U.S. Navy Special Forces and Search and Rescue Swimmers. It is called as a blatant jest toward those similar exclamations. The term huzzah has been adopted, with no change in meaning, by modern gamers and those involved in the Renaissance Fair circuit both of which communities, admittedly, overlap. This was popularized by the comic strip Knights of the Dinner Table. Recently, the character Tobias from the television show "Arrested Development" used this expression. Coincidentally, "Huzzah!" is an out-of-print board game that was produced by Cheapass Games until 2002. It is based on Renaissance fairs. The game can now be downloaded as a .pdf file from the company's Web site. Just so you know.

Disco Stu said...

The term "woot" originated as a hacker term for root (or administrative) access to a computer. However, with the term as coincides with the gamer term, "w00t". "w00t" was originally an trunicated expression common among players of Dungeons and Dragons tabletop role-playing game for "Wow, loot!" Thus the term passed into the Net culture, where it thrived in video game communities and lost its original meaning and is used simply as a term of excitement, i.e. "I defeated the dark sorcerer! Woot!" "Woot" is also an interjection similar to "Yay!" or "Woohoo!" used to express joy or excitement, usually about some kind of accomplishment. Primarily used by gamers, spreading rapidly to anyone who chats online and beyond, i.e. "Woot! I got an A on this test."

A said...

Disco Stu, whoever you are, thanks for the explanation. But it should be noted that your Huzzah explanation was stolen directly from wikipedia!

mo*reezy said...

the indians should give a big WOOT then, and say "I defeated the dark sorceror!" They sure did. now it's the BoSox's turn.


Henceforth, I think that instead of saying WOOT, I will say "I defeated the dark sorceror!". It just rolls off the tongue, doesn't it?

Disco Stu said...

True about Wikipedia. Well, what can I say? Disco Stu knows nothing, only how to please the ladies with his smooth moves.

Copyright © 2008 - not an only child - is proudly powered by Blogger
Smashing Magazine - Design Disease - Blog and Web - Dilectio Blogger Template